How to prevent puppy from biting people?

posted by on 2016.07.24, under Sponsored Post
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How to prevent puppy from biting people?

There are lots of stuff that a little puppy has to learn during its life.
One of the most important lessons is how not to bite other people and dogs. While this is a normal, animal behavior, often done in a playful manner, it can be really troublesome. As puppy’s teeth start to grow, bite becomes stronger and stronger until the dog ultimately starts hurting those around him.
Even though dog doesn’t have a bad intention, it is crucial to teach him how to stop with such behavior. Here are some tips and tricks that will help you do just that.

Training basics

When it comes to dog training, most of them are similar in their core.
First and foremost, we need to mention consistency. No matter what you’re trying to teach a dog, you have to start on time. There are no shortcuts and you need to make sure that a puppy gets what you’re trying to tell him. This is why every training needs to start from the earliest age. If you have several dogs in the house, you shouldn’t have a preferential treatment; they all have to behave in the same way.
Second, you need to avoid violence and punishment of any kind. Dog should never be hit as this can cause a gap between the two of you. Every lesson can be taught easily and calmly without ever raising your hand. Repetitiveness is the key.
These simply tricks work with every type of a training. Keep in mind that dog training is also important for developing discipline. Well-trained dog will behave appropriately and every following lesson you try to instill will be easier.

Showing emotions

So, what is the main problem with biting?
Well, it hurts a lot. But worst yet, puppy will not be aware of its jaw strength. It will not be aware that you’re getting hurt which is first and foremost barrier.
While dogs are unable to understand human tongue, they are more than capable of picking up your emotions and sensations. If you start crying or yelling or showing any type of a discomfort, puppy will likely pick up on that.
When a dog bites you, make sure to be vocal. If possible, even startle him. Go a bit overboard so it gets the message. But don’t think that this will always have a positive result.

What if dog continues biting?

Your second best bet is to remove stimuli. In other words, stop playing with it.
Dogs often bite as they get excited and become playful. You were probably caressing him beforehand or had some other physical contact. If you simply stop doing it, dog will be less inclined to bite or do anything else.
Simply ignore your puppy if it starts biting.
Later on, try playing once again. If a dog again starts biting, stop it again. It needs to learn that such behavior is intolerable and will result in you stopping the playtime.

Extreme cases

There are some extreme cases where dog will continue biting no matter what.
Even if you remove yourself from equation or show emotions, it still might continue biting. In these situations, you have to put a dog away. Find a secluded part of the room where you will put it to cool off. This way, puppy will understand it did something wrong and due to sheer isolation, it will be dissatisfied.
This is the harshest measure but sometimes it has to be enforced. Keep in mind that you still shouldn’t inflict any physical or verbal punishment; just do your best to ignore the dog and place it “outside of the pack”.

Conclusion

Biting is crucial not only for you but for other people in your vicinity as well as other dogs. If you allow your puppy to continue behaving this way, it will get burned sooner than later. Other dog might attack it or people will simply stop ignoring it.
While biting may seem important in the animal world, dog needs to understand there are limits to its behavior. You are the one that has to impose them and no matter how hard it may seem at first, you need to remain consistent in your efforts.

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